Tag Archives: clothing

costume

Dogon or Bamana “spritual armour” protection clothing

BAMANA / DOGON HUNTER'S SHIRT, Mali Photographs © Tim Hamill BAMANA / DOGON HUNTER'S SHIRT, Mali Photographs © Tim Hamill BAMANA / DOGON HUNTER'S SHIRT, Mali Photographs © Tim Hamill BAMANA / DOGON HUNTER'S SHIRT, Mali Photographs © Tim Hamill BAMANA / DOGON HUNTER'S SHIRT, Mali Photographs © Tim Hamill BAMANA / DOGON HUNTER'S SHIRT, Mali Photographs © Tim Hamill BAMANA / DOGON HUNTER'S SHIRT, Mali Photographs © Tim Hamill BAMANA / DOGON HUNTER'S SHIRT, Mali Photographs © Tim Hamill BAMANA / DOGON HUNTER'S SHIRT, Mali Photographs © Tim Hamill BAMANA / DOGON HUNTER'S SHIRT, Mali Photographs © Tim Hamill BAMANA / DOGON HUNTER'S SHIRT, Mali Photographs © Tim Hamill BAMANA / DOGON HUNTER'S SHIRT, Mali Photographs © Tim Hamill BAMANA / DOGON HUNTER'S SHIRT, Mali Photographs © Tim Hamill BAMANA / DOGON HUNTER'S SHIRT, Mali Photographs © Tim Hamill

 

Photographs © Tim Hamill

“These garments, called shirts, jackets or tunics were worn by Dogon or Bamana men for protection in the forest, from both wild animals and dangerous spirits. A successful hunter must not only be master of the forest and wild animals, but must also have the spiritual power necessary to negotiate the dangerous supernatural realm. They are often embellished with small objects, animal horns, mirrors, jewelry, and leather pouches, that provide the “spiritual armor” necessary to protect the hunter from both real and spirit forces.”

http://www.hamillgallery.com/BAMANA/BamanaHuntersShirts/BamanaShirts.html

 

costume inspiration

Inuit clothing

Inuit woman wearing an amauti and carrying a child on her back [graphic material] : N.W.T. [Nunavut], ca. 1926 - 1943.

Inuit woman wearing an amauti and carrying a child on her back (graphic material): N.W.T. (Nunavut), ca. 1926 - 1943.

Copper Inuit Clothing, Front View (Diamond Jenness/CMC/51234)

Copper Inuit Clothing, Front View (Diamond Jenness/CMC/51234)Copper Inuit Clothing, Back View (Diamond Jenness/CMC/51235)

Copper Inuit Clothing, Back View (Diamond Jenness/CMC/51235)

Copper Inuit Clothing, Back View (Diamond Jenness/CMC/51235)

This Inuit woman, photographed by the Scottish botanist-explorer Isobel Wylie Hutchison in the 1920s, is dressed in her colourful traditional national costume. The most characteristic part of this outfit is perhaps the "kamiker", or heel-less sealskin top-boots, which reach up to the knee in the case of men, but well above that in the case of women, as illustrated here. The outer surface of the women's boots is dyed white, scarlet, or blue, and decorated with abstract geometrical patterns of brightly-coloured leather strips. There is a removable inner lining which keeps the feet and legs warm. Hutchison found that such footwear was essential, not only for negotiating the slippery rocks and shingle, but for protection against insect bites.

This Inuit woman, photographed by the Scottish botanist-explorer Isobel Wylie Hutchison in the 1920s, is dressed in her colourful traditional national costume. The most characteristic part of this outfit is perhaps the "kamiker", or heel-less sealskin top-boots, which reach up to the knee in the case of men, but well above that in the case of women, as illustrated here. The outer surface of the women's boots is dyed white, scarlet, or blue, and decorated with abstract geometrical patterns of brightly-coloured leather strips. There is a removable inner lining which keeps the feet and legs warm. Hutchison found that such footwear was essential, not only for negotiating the slippery rocks and shingle, but for protection against insect bites.

costume magic

Akhnif

An akhnif is a cloak worn in Morocco by Jewish and Berber males. The eye shape is thought to be protection against the evil eye.

Akhnif from Textile Museum of Canada

Akhnif from the Jewish Moroccan Heritage Museum

Akhnif from Marrakesh Express

Boy’s brown akhnif…The narrow, long henna-dyed “lens” unambiguously represents a vulva. It is the symbol for the mother who all her life “carries her son in her womb” and lovingly hopes to protect him with this cape.

From ‘Berber Carpets of Morocco: The Symbols Origin and Meaning’ By Bruno Barbatti.

costume

Anishinaabe outfit

 

Anishinaabe outfit collected by Andrew Foster ca. 1790 Fort Michilimackinac, Michigan Birchbark, cotton, linen, wool, feathers, silk, silver brooches, porcupine quills, horsehair, hide, sinew The Andrew Foster Collection

Anishinaabe outfit collected by Andrew Foster ca. 1790 Fort Michilimackinac, Michigan Birchbark, cotton, linen, wool, feathers, silk, silver brooches, porcupine quills, horsehair, hide, sinew The Andrew Foster Collection

costume

Arctic clothing

 

Inuit amauti or tuilli (woman’s parka) ca. 1890–1925 Iqluligaarjuk (Chesterfield Inlet), Nunavut, Canada Parka: caribou skin, glass beads, stroud cloth, caribou teeth, and metal pendants; needlecase: ivory, seal hide; carrying strap with toggles: caribou hide, ivory 143 x 65 cm

Inuit amauti or tuilli (woman’s parka) ca. 1890–1925 Iqluligaarjuk (Chesterfield Inlet), Nunavut, Canada Parka: caribou skin, glass beads, stroud cloth, caribou teeth, and metal pendants; needlecase: ivory, seal hide; carrying strap with toggles: caribou hide, ivory 143 x 65 cm

 

Cree misko takiy (hide coat) ca. 1780–1820 Alberta, Canada Moose hide, paint, porcupine quill, hair 125 x 160 cm

Cree misko takiy (hide coat) ca. 1780–1820 Alberta, Canada Moose hide, paint, porcupine quill, hair 125 x 160 cm

 

Kenneth Kaiona (Copper Inuit, ca. 1850–d.?), dance cap ca. 1920 Coronation Gulf, Alaska Caribou hide, ermine fur, yellow-billed loon skin, sinew, wool, cotton fabric 20 x 23 x 32 cm Gift of John D. Ferguson

Kenneth Kaiona (Copper Inuit, ca. 1850–d.?), dance cap ca. 1920 Coronation Gulf, Alaska Caribou hide, ermine fur, yellow-billed loon skin, sinew, wool, cotton fabric 20 x 23 x 32 cm Gift of John D. Ferguson

http://www.nmai.si.edu/exhibitions/infinityofnations/arctic-subarctic.html

costume

Pascal Sébah

 

(1) and (2): Zeı̈bek; and (3): Artisan of Aı̈din (Aydın). Studio portrait of models wearing traditional clothing from the province of Aı̈din (Aydın), Ottoman Empire

(1) and (2): Zeı̈bek; and (3): Artisan of Aı̈din (Aydın). Studio portrait of models wearing traditional clothing from the province of Aı̈din (Aydın), Ottoman Empire

 

(1): Peasant woman from the environs of Damas (Damascus); (2): Druze woman from the environs of Damas (Damascus); and (3) married woman of Damas (Damascus). Studio portrait of models wearing traditional clothing from the province of Surı̈yè (Syria), Ottoman Empire

(1): Peasant woman from the environs of Damas (Damascus); (2): Druze woman from the environs of Damas (Damascus); and (3) married woman of Damas (Damascus). Studio portrait of models wearing traditional clothing from the province of Surı̈yè (Syria), Ottoman Empire

(1): Kurdish woman from the area of Yuzgat (Yozgat); (2): wife of a Christian artisan of Angora (Ankara); and (3): wife of a Muslim artisan of Angora (Ankara). Studio portrait of models wearing traditional clothing from the province of Angora (Ankara), Ottoman Empire

(1): Kurdish woman from the area of Yuzgat (Yozgat); (2): wife of a Christian artisan of Angora (Ankara); and (3): wife of a Muslim artisan of Angora (Ankara). Studio portrait of models wearing traditional clothing from the province of Angora (Ankara), Ottoman Empire

(1) Married Muslim woman of Skodra (Shkodër); (2) Married Christian woman of Skodra (Shkodër); and (3) peasant woman of Malissor. Studio portrait of models wearing traditional clothing from the province of Skodra (Isķodra), Ottoman Empire

(1) Married Muslim woman of Skodra (Shkodër); (2) Married Christian woman of Skodra (Shkodër); and (3) peasant woman of Malissor. Studio portrait of models wearing traditional clothing from the province of Skodra (Isķodra), Ottoman Empire

(1) Resident of Mostar; (2) bourgeois of Bosna-Seraı̈ (Sarajevo) ; and (3) married woman of Bosna-Seraı̈ (Sarajevo). Studio portrait of models wearing traditional clothing from the province of Bosna (Bosnia), Ottoman Empire

(1) Resident of Mostar; (2) bourgeois of Bosna-Seraı̈ (Sarajevo) ; and (3) married woman of Bosna-Seraı̈ (Sarajevo). Studio portrait of models wearing traditional clothing from the province of Bosna (Bosnia), Ottoman Empire

(1): Bachi Bozouk (mercenary soldier) of Angora (Ankara); (2): Muslim peasant from the area of Angora (Ankara); and (3): Muslim peasant woman from the area of Angora (Ankara). Studio portrait of models wearing traditional clothing from the province of Angora (Ankara), Ottoman Empire

(1): Bachi Bozouk (mercenary soldier) of Angora (Ankara); (2): Muslim peasant from the area of Angora (Ankara); and (3): Muslim peasant woman from the area of Angora (Ankara). Studio portrait of models wearing traditional clothing from the province of Angora (Ankara), Ottoman Empire

Photographs by Pascal Sébah

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