Tag Archives: inuit

costume inspiration

Inuit clothing

Inuit woman wearing an amauti and carrying a child on her back [graphic material] : N.W.T. [Nunavut], ca. 1926 - 1943.

Inuit woman wearing an amauti and carrying a child on her back (graphic material): N.W.T. (Nunavut), ca. 1926 - 1943.

Copper Inuit Clothing, Front View (Diamond Jenness/CMC/51234)

Copper Inuit Clothing, Front View (Diamond Jenness/CMC/51234)Copper Inuit Clothing, Back View (Diamond Jenness/CMC/51235)

Copper Inuit Clothing, Back View (Diamond Jenness/CMC/51235)

Copper Inuit Clothing, Back View (Diamond Jenness/CMC/51235)

This Inuit woman, photographed by the Scottish botanist-explorer Isobel Wylie Hutchison in the 1920s, is dressed in her colourful traditional national costume. The most characteristic part of this outfit is perhaps the "kamiker", or heel-less sealskin top-boots, which reach up to the knee in the case of men, but well above that in the case of women, as illustrated here. The outer surface of the women's boots is dyed white, scarlet, or blue, and decorated with abstract geometrical patterns of brightly-coloured leather strips. There is a removable inner lining which keeps the feet and legs warm. Hutchison found that such footwear was essential, not only for negotiating the slippery rocks and shingle, but for protection against insect bites.

This Inuit woman, photographed by the Scottish botanist-explorer Isobel Wylie Hutchison in the 1920s, is dressed in her colourful traditional national costume. The most characteristic part of this outfit is perhaps the "kamiker", or heel-less sealskin top-boots, which reach up to the knee in the case of men, but well above that in the case of women, as illustrated here. The outer surface of the women's boots is dyed white, scarlet, or blue, and decorated with abstract geometrical patterns of brightly-coloured leather strips. There is a removable inner lining which keeps the feet and legs warm. Hutchison found that such footwear was essential, not only for negotiating the slippery rocks and shingle, but for protection against insect bites.

costume

Arctic clothing

 

Inuit amauti or tuilli (woman’s parka) ca. 1890–1925 Iqluligaarjuk (Chesterfield Inlet), Nunavut, Canada Parka: caribou skin, glass beads, stroud cloth, caribou teeth, and metal pendants; needlecase: ivory, seal hide; carrying strap with toggles: caribou hide, ivory 143 x 65 cm

Inuit amauti or tuilli (woman’s parka) ca. 1890–1925 Iqluligaarjuk (Chesterfield Inlet), Nunavut, Canada Parka: caribou skin, glass beads, stroud cloth, caribou teeth, and metal pendants; needlecase: ivory, seal hide; carrying strap with toggles: caribou hide, ivory 143 x 65 cm

 

Cree misko takiy (hide coat) ca. 1780–1820 Alberta, Canada Moose hide, paint, porcupine quill, hair 125 x 160 cm

Cree misko takiy (hide coat) ca. 1780–1820 Alberta, Canada Moose hide, paint, porcupine quill, hair 125 x 160 cm

 

Kenneth Kaiona (Copper Inuit, ca. 1850–d.?), dance cap ca. 1920 Coronation Gulf, Alaska Caribou hide, ermine fur, yellow-billed loon skin, sinew, wool, cotton fabric 20 x 23 x 32 cm Gift of John D. Ferguson

Kenneth Kaiona (Copper Inuit, ca. 1850–d.?), dance cap ca. 1920 Coronation Gulf, Alaska Caribou hide, ermine fur, yellow-billed loon skin, sinew, wool, cotton fabric 20 x 23 x 32 cm Gift of John D. Ferguson

http://www.nmai.si.edu/exhibitions/infinityofnations/arctic-subarctic.html

inspiration

John Webber

shadowinuit

Chugach  Eskimo  woman  with labret  and piercings, Prince  William  Sound, Alaska, in engraving  made  1778
Chugach

Chugach man wearing spruce root hat, beads, earrings, nose piercing, woven cloak; Prince William Sound, Alaska engraving c. 1778

oonalashka

A Woman of Oonalaska (sic) [engraved portrait by John Webber of Aleut woman with tattooed face and linked nose labret.]

nootka

Nootka woman with woven hat & cedarbark cape, Nootka Sound, British Columbia, in engraving made 1778

oonalashkaman

A Man of Oonalashka, c. April 1778

mask

Mask



Mask, originally uploaded by Travis S..

inspiration

Nunivak Face



Nunivak Face, originally uploaded by Travis S..

inspiration

Inuit Shaman

From randafricanart.com. And I think I read the following from Shaman: the wounded healer by Joan Halifax: 

This art is not art for art, rather it is art for survival for it gives structure and coherence to the unfathomable and intangible. By ‘making’ that which is the unknown, the shaman attains some degree of control over the awesome forces of the mysterium.

costume

Inuit women

inspiration

Inuit shaman with massive hands

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Tales from the Igloo

Illustrations by Agnes Nanogak from the book ‘Tales from the Igloo’.

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