Tag Archives: photography

costume

Japanese theatre costume and a samurai

peabodyjapan2673924

peabodyjapan2673919

peabodyjapan2673922

peabodyjapan2673920

peabodyjapan2673916

costume

Empty costumes

peabodybear60700001

Pomo bear disguise (N. America)

peabody81050029

Blackfoot dance bustle (N. America)

peabody31030022

Tupi costume (Bolivia)

peabody12160076

Yuki dance outfit (N. America)

peabody131060016

Miwok dance costume (N. America)

Peabody museum

costume inspiration

Maori women

maoriwoman

maoriwoman1

maoriwoman2

maoriwoman3

maoriwoman4

maoriwoman8

maoriwoman6

maoriwoman7

Incredible portraits of Maori women from the National Library of New Zealand.

Uncategorized

Étienne-Jules Marey

marey2

V_14

marey1

V_15

2278525544_e13a295788_o

Found via http://e-l-i-s-e.blogspot.com/

mask

Mud man Papua New Guinea

Mud man Papua New Guinea, originally uploaded by Eric Lafforgue.

costume

Papua New Guinea Mount Hagen festival

lonecostumer

Some very beautiful modern photographs of Papua New Guinea and many other countries by Eric Lafforgue.

costume

WEST AFRICAN MASQUERADE

galembo_pg-tree_lg

galembo_2_new_lg

galembo_6b_lg

galembo-skull_lg

Phyllis Galembo

Uncategorized

AINU TATTOO

04754500

The completed lip tattoos of women were significant in regards to Ainu perceptions of life experience. First, these tattoos were believed to repel evil spirits from entering the body (mouth) and causing sickness or misfortune. Secondly, the lip tattoos indicated that a woman had reached maturity and was ready for marriage. And finally, lip tattoos assured the woman life after death in the place of her deceased ancestors.

Apart from lip tattoos, however, Ainu women wore several other tattoo marks on their arms and hands usually consisting of curvilinear and geometric designs. These motifs, which were begun as early as the fifth or sixth year, were intended to protect young girls from evil spirits…Other marks were placed on various parts of the body as charms against diseases like painful rheumatism.

http://www.vanishingtattoo.com/tattooing_among_japans_ainu.htm

http://siris-collections.si.edu/search/results.jsp?q=ainu+tattoo&x=0&y=0

drawing

NORTHERN BORNEO TATTOO

image-9

This Kayan woman (ca. 1930) was of high rank, as evidenced
by the number of rings around her calves. The motif running up the thighs is called silong lejau (tiger’s faces). At the terminus of these bands you can barely make out a different pattern just above the horizontal lines of the calf. This is called nang klimge (“important design”) and is a degraded anthropomorph. The curclicues below the horizontal lines around the calves are called tushun tuva “the tuba root motif”). Each one of these designs was believed to repel evil forces in the jungle. The unmarked portions of her thigh are also visible

inspiration

GEISHA LEANING ON SNOW SHOVEL

css.php